Expatriate Engagement

Thematic Info-Sheet 

Countries: 

Egypt, Iraq, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia 

Emergencies: 

Iraq 

Covering period:  

2017 

Contact Name(s):  

Roberto Cancel 

 

Expatriate Engagement – Regional Overview 

Overall situation  

Migrants and expatriate communities play a significant role in development as confirmed by objective 19 of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration (GCM) where governments commit to empowering them “to catalyse their development contributions, and to harness the benefits of migration as a source of sustainable development.”  This is nowhere more relevant than in the Arab world. In 2015, UNDESA estimated that 26,052,294 people had moved from Arab countries with about half remaining within the region. Including these intraregional migrants, the region hosts roughly 14 per cent of global international migrant1 stocks. These complex dynamics signify that the opportunities for countries in the region to leverage migration for development are multifaceted and involve perspectives of countries of origin and destination. Countries of origin can benefit from human capital, according to OECD data 26 per cent of migrants 25 years old and above from Arab countries have completed some form of tertiary education. In terms of financial capital, the World Bank has estimated that expatriates from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) have a total income of $275 billion and savings of $55 billion.2 To build and strengthen partnerships between diaspora members and their countries of origin, governments have to acquire knowledge about their countries’ diaspora, not only how many and where, but what they have to offer in skills and experience. It is also important to establish mutual trust to fully engage diaspora members as true partners in the development of their countries of origin. Diaspora engagement programmes devote attention to strengthening the capacity of both government institutions and diaspora communities to work with one another and with other stakeholders. Once these partnerships are established different methods can be used to mobilise diaspora in supporting development. 

 

IOM works for an orderly, safe and regular migration. It aims to guarantee a safe return home for migrants and effective reintegration. IOM would also like to draw the attention to the following pertaining issues: 

  • CONTINUED NEEDS FOR INTERNATIONAL PROTECTION 

  • VULNERABILITIES ON THE INCREASE 

  • HOST GOVERNMENTS CONTINUE TO BEAR THE BURDEN 

  • FUNDING NOT KEEPING UP WITH NEEDS 

  • Important Figures  -Figures from 2017 

# of micro-projects implemented in partnership with the contribution of expatriates. 

 10 

# of individuals trained on migration and development including government officials, civil society, and expatriates and their associations. 

21390 

# of institutions provided with technical assistance to promote expatriate engagement. 

47  

 

FUNDING 

Over 3.5 million USD  

PARTNERS & DONORS 

Italian Agency for Development Cooperation – Egypt and Tunisia 

The Kingdom of the Netherlands – Iraq 

IOM Development Fund - Sudan