Migration Integration

Thematic Info-Sheet 

Countries: 

Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Kuwait, and Tunisia 

Emergencies: 

Libya 

Covering period:  

2017 

Contact Name(s):  

Roberto Cancel 

 

Migrant Integration – Regional Overview 

Overall situation  

Successful integration is essential for all stakeholders, not only in terms of the benefits gained from migration, but also for the well-being of migrants and the security, stability, social harmony and prosperity of society as a whole. While the term “integration” is one that is understood differently depending upon the country and context, it can generally be defined as the process of mutual adaptation between the host society and the migrants themselves. Thus, strategies must be simultaneously developed to educate receiving communities on the positive contributions of migrants, as well as the benefits of living and working together in multi-cultural settings. Comprehensive approaches to migrant integration allow migrants to develop their human capital during their stay, thereby fostering economic. Concretely, migrants come with a variety of skills and knowledge and entrepreneurial spirit that can benefit their new homes if they are given the opportunity to engage in the local economy. For example, the Centre for European Economic Research found that currently the German National Budget received a net benefit of 3,300 EUR for each foreign resident however it is losing out on 118,400 EUR  per person due to lack of full economic integration.1 Similarly the German Development Bank found that migrants are 11 per cent more likely to start a business than average and create more jobs when they do, but these businesses are 14 per cent more likely to fail within 36 months due to unfavourable conditions.2 While such in depth studies are lacking in the Middle East and North Africa, one recent study reports that Syrians have brought 800 million USD in investment to Egypt’s struggling economy in spite of challenges in accessing business registration, work permits and even residency permits.

Integration policy intersects with a number of other major policy areas, including employment and labour market policy, equal opportunities and non-discrimination, social cohesion, public health, education, naturalization and citizenship, and regional development. In particular it is important to prevent discrimination that limits access to basic services such as education and health. For example, Morocco implemented regularization campaigns in 2014 and 2017 ensure that they have equal access to services and can participate and contribute fully to their new home. During the first regularization campaign, 23,096 requests for regularization were accepted and during the second campaign, still ongoing, over 27,000 applications have been submitted. Along with basic service access to labour markets is key for migrants to be able to maximize their contribution to the economies of host countries however regulatory constraints often makes this near impossible. Recognizing this, as part of the Jordan Compact, Jordan has committed to facilitate 200,000 work permits for Syrians displaced in the country. 

IOM works for an orderly, safe and regular migration. It aims to guarantee a safe return home for migrants and effective reintegration. IOM would also like to draw the attention to the following pertaining issues: 

  • CONTINUED NEEDS FOR INTERNATIONAL PROTECTION 

  • VULNERABILITIES ON THE INCREASE 

  • HOST GOVERNMENTS CONTINUE TO BEAR THE BURDEN 

  • FUNDING NOT KEEPING UP WITH NEEDS 

  •  Figures from 201

# of migrants who have improved or acquired new vocational skills. 

330 

# of private sector actors senitised about the hiring migrants and the benefits of a diverse working place. 

68 

# of government officials trained on migrant integration and/or nondiscrimination. 

498 

# of individuals reached through activities to promote social cohesion and mutual understanding, including community events and awareness campaigns. 

6304 

 

FUNDING 

Over 8 million USD  

PARTNERS & DONORS 

European Union – Regional including Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia 

Kingdom of Belgium - Morocco 

Government of Japan - Egypt